thedigitallibrarian
smithsonianlibraries:

Tailor of Gloucester by Beatrix Potter from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum Library’s Rare Book Collection on Juvenile Literature.
Beatrix Potter’s work, while already considered in the Public Domain in the United States, entered the public domain in Europe this year, 70 years after her death. 
On this side of the pond, nothing new will enter the Public Domain until 2019, due to a 1998 law increasing copyright to 95 years or more for works published after 1923. 
We missed a post on Public Domain Day, the first of the year, but wanted to shed a little light on the topic, regardless. Find out more at the Duke Center for the Study of the Public Domain.

smithsonianlibraries:

Tailor of Gloucester by Beatrix Potter from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum Library’s Rare Book Collection on Juvenile Literature.

Beatrix Potter’s work, while already considered in the Public Domain in the United States, entered the public domain in Europe this year, 70 years after her death. 

On this side of the pond, nothing new will enter the Public Domain until 2019, due to a 1998 law increasing copyright to 95 years or more for works published after 1923. 

We missed a post on Public Domain Day, the first of the year, but wanted to shed a little light on the topic, regardless. Find out more at the Duke Center for the Study of the Public Domain.

thatgothlibrarian
shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”
(at the Avis Frank Gallery, 1606 White Oak Dr., Houston, TX 77009)

YESYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYES

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

(at the Avis Frank Gallery, 1606 White Oak Dr., Houston, TX 77009)

YESYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYEYSYES